Being led by feelings

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Had a meeting the other day and during the meeting my partner started leading a different way. This caused me tension as I knew instinctively that this was wrong. I knew that feeding the lion raw fresh meat was not a good tactic because the lion will eat your hand and arm as well as the meat, and the lion could possibly eat you whole as well. I felt that tactic being applied by my partner was very naive and without forethought, which would enable the lion to escape and get off. My partners communication style was dangerously close to luring and trapping me in the lion’s cage. My partner seemed unintentionally to be luring me into a unstable situation, one which he would ultimately have no control over and I would end up being the victim of. What happened is my instincts kicked in. I knew I had to start communicating in a sink or swim manner in order to over-ride his words and come out on top. I knew instinctively that he is no match for the lion and to pretend to be is stupid, deadly and filled with a completely lack of respect for the animal kingdom and their power. I would not be a victim to this. I had to stand and take charge.

 

What is Cancer anyway?

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The illness cancer is such a personal medical illness that I wonder what the public actually knows or understands from cancer. How is cancer created? How is the illness developed? Who gets it? And who is exempt from cancer? In which country is there more cancer than other countries? And do some countries register cancer while other countries do not? How far has the cancer research come in the last decade? Is there a cure of some cancers and not others?

The view point of cancer from the perspective of a doctor would be very different then the view point of a patient inflicted with cancer. I do not think a medical doctor who is specialized in one from of cancer or the other would be able to treat his / her own cancer. The doctor who got cancer him / herself would have to get treated by other medical cancer specialists.

Cancer is often pain and suffering. It needs intensive medical treatment and medicine to help conquer the cancer. Many people in the Western world as in the Eastern world get the illness. It does not discriminate. One of the most inspiration cancer patients is the Canadian named Terry Fox. As a young teenage Canadian he attempted to run from one side of Canada to the other in the name of cancer. He attempted to raise awareness about the disease, and at the same time he was an Existentialist who believed in fighting for the right to live and have a higher quality of life for all kinds of individuals with cancer; and all the types of different cancer was key to his existence. Terry Fox, the Canadian cancer advocate was a selfless human, an altruistic human and an inspiration to many generations in the medical industry and beyond, all in the name of cancer. He is a hero. His statue is placed in Victoria City, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada at Mile Zero for all to see.

Employment on Vancouver Island, British Columbia Canada

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I have been employed with Company X for 8 years now. It is amazing the ingenious nature of the Head-Quarters running Company X. The MBA trained Executives and Masters of Organizational Psychologist Executive come up with wild and exciting blueprints which lead to efficiency and more effective business protocols. Somehow the Top Executives study the Employment Laws into the tiniest details and then create sub-set business models inside the multiple companies in the form of pilot projects. The
Upper Management Teams at the Head-Quarters figure out ways to slash the jobs of their upper level co-workers as well as the lower level co-workers. The scheme created by the Master of Business Administration trained Top Executives are so precise and conducted with such a precision; plus covered up with a psychological business flare as to cover up any signs of imbalance to the employment system – that witnessing & experiencing the roll out of these pilot projects are flawless; and they get implemented as easy as the pureness of opium in Afghanistan.

No Tulips Please

In 1945 January my father was born in Amsterdam during the Hunger Winter. It is a miracle my father was born at all because there was virtually zero food in Amsterdam at that time. It was a time was a lot of Dutch citizen in this area were forced to eat tulips. Later on in my life, I learnt that both of my grandparents worked in the tulip industries in the province, North Holland in the Netherlands. When I was 17 years old in the Netherlands in the city of Haarlem, my grandfather took in to Hillegom to peel tulips forĀ  summer job. It was a hard job, and I could not peel as fast as the other Dutch people in my group. Later that week my grandfather took me to a tulip factory that he knew about in Velsen-Zuid and got me a job auditing the tulip bulbs. I did that job for 4 – 5 months. Later on in life, I moved to Victoria, Vancouver Island and when I landed at Company X they forwarded me directly on to the Garden Center because my last name was van der Pol. Somehow the upper management of Company X could stereotype me and my Dutch heritage in a matter of a micro-second based on my last name. But in actual fact I do not like tulips myself, I am allegic to them. I get an adversary emotional reaction to the different colors of live flowers – especially tulips.c16c9a05b8e229a996804d4ae19ed91b

Trying to find a tie in. Reading books.

 

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  • Book list – listed by first come first serve basis – not alphabetical
  1. Forced Removal – The Division, Segregation and Control of the People of South Africa, Elaine Unterhalter, International Defence and Aid Fund for Southern Africa, 1987
  2. Racial Segregation and the Origins of Apartheid in South Africa, 1919 to 36, Saul Dubow, ST Anthony’s College Oxford, 1989
  3. Perceptions of Apartheid – The Churches and political changes in South Africa, Ernie Regehr, Herald Press, 1979
  4. Politics of race, class and nationalism in twentieth century South Africa, Shula Marks and Stanley Trapido, London and New York, 1987
  5. The History of the Great Boer Trek, Hon. Henry Cloete, LL.D. her majesty’s High Commissioner for Natal, 1843 – 44, London, John Murray, Albemarle Street, 1899
  6. The White Tribe of Africa – South Africa in perspective, David Harrison, British Broadcasting Corporation, 1981
  7. The Hunger Winter – Occupied Holland 1944 – 5, Henri A. van der Zee, Jill Norman & Hobhouse, 1982
  8. The Netherlands and Nazi Germany, Louis de Jong, Harvard University Press, 1990
  9. Underground out of Holland, S. E. Hanson, London Ian Allan Ltd, 1975
  10. Nazi Rule and Dutch Collaboration – The Netherlands under German Occupation 1940 – 1945, Louise Willmot, Berg – Oxford / New York / Hamburg, 1988
  11. Plantation Jamaica 1750 – 1850 – Capital and Control in Colonial Economy, B. W. Higman, University of the West Indies Press, 2005
  12. Isle of Devils – Bermuda under the Somers Island Company 1609 – 1685, Jean Kennedy, Collins, 1971
  13. Islands Bermuda, John J. Jackson, David and Charles, 1988
  14. The Story of Bermuda and Her People, W. S. Zuill, MacMillan, 1973
  15. Bermuda from Sail to Steam 1784 – 1901 (Volume 1 & 2), Henry C. Wilkinson, London Oxford University Press, 1973
  16. Black Families in Modern Bermuda, Max Paul, Germany, 1983

Reading builds empathy, April 2017

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Books that I have read, April 19, 2017. I am currently reading Nelson Mandela’s book, Long Walk to Freedom, and while I read I read other subjects to create a greater understand of the African context, in order to try to imagine the situations Nelson Mandela and others like him encountered.

  1. A State of Blood, The Inside Story of Idi Amin by Henry Kyemba, Paddington Press, Ltd., 1977
  2. White African, an Early Autobiography by L.S.B. Leakey, Cambridge Massachesetts 02138, 1966
  3. Kaffir Boy, The True Story of a Black Youth’s Coming of Age in Apartheid South Africa, Mark Mathabane, Macmillan publishing company, New York, 1986
  4. Operation Moses, The Story of the Exodus of the Falasha Jews from Ethiopia, Tudor Parfitt, Weidenfeld and Nicolson London, 1985
  5. Great Zimbabwe, P.S. Garlake, Thames and Hudson, 1973
  6. South Africa and the Logic of the Regional Cooperation, James J. Hentz, Indiana University Press, 2005
  7. After Apartheid, Reinventing South Africa? Ian Shapiro and Kahreen Tebeau, University of Virginia Press, 2011
  8. The Republic of the Transkei, Chris van Rensburg Publications Ltd., 1976

 

 

 

Books I’m reading April 13, 2017. Canada

 

  1. Princes of the Mughal Empire, 1504 to 1719, by Munis D. Faruqui, Cambridge University Press, 2012
  2. The Munghal Empire, Michael H. Fisher, I.B. Tauris, London and New York, 2016
  3. Compound Dilemmas, Democracy, Collective Action, and Superpower Rivalry by Michael D. McGinnis and John T. Williams, Ann Arbor, The University of Michigan Press, 2004
  4. For the Soul of Mankind, The United States, The Soviet Union, and The Cold War, by Melvyn P. Leffler, Hill and Wang, 2007
  5. Orgins of Containment, A Psychological Explanation, by Deborah Welch Larson, Princeton University Press, 1985
  6. Racism without Racists, Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States by Eduardo Bonilla-Silva, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers Inc. 2006
  7. Cecil Rhodes, Flawed Colossus by Brian Roberts, Hamish Hamilton, London, 1987
  8. Khomeini’s Ghost, The Iranian Revolution and the Rise of Militant Islam by Con Coughlin, Harpers Collins Publishers, 2009
  9. Eagle’s Nest, Ismaili Castles in Iran and Syria by Peter Willey, I. B. Tauris Publishers, 2005
  10. The Mughal and the Sikh Rulers and the Vaishnava of Pindori, by B.N. Goswamy and J.S. Grewal, Indian Institute of Advanced Study, 1969
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